Every initiative that organisations develop must be evaluated. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. It is absolutely essential. However, organisations must ensure that they are measuring the right things.

There’s a lot of discussion about aligning training metrics to business goals when it comes to learning. It’s an excellent point. The entire goal of learning is to improve employee performance, which will ultimately improve organisational performance.

Learning and organisational goals should be aligned early in the design process. If you’re using ADDIE to create a programme, creating alignment should ideally happen between the ASSESSMENT and DESIGN phases. Because it is here that the organisation decides what the training will cover.

Employee feedback is a different learning metric that is frequently ignored. Organizations occasionally lose sight of the importance of employee feedback when they are too preoccupied with business metrics.

Employee feedback is a different learning metric that is frequently ignored. Organizations occasionally lose sight of the importance of employee feedback when they are too preoccupied with business metrics. Here are three possibilities to ask employees for their opinions on learning:

One-on-One Meetings

When learning in an individual setting, such as with a mentor or manager, it may be beneficial to solicit direct feedback. This could be established during the initial mentoring session or brought up on a regular basis during one-on-one meetings. As a result, the employee understands that feedback is expected and can begin to express their thoughts.

Person-to-person feedback allows both the sender and the recipient to ask clarifying questions. Individual trust and sincerity are required for the feedback to be accepted.

Level 1 Evaluation (Reaction)

A level one evaluation is a piece of paper or an online assessment that assesses an employee’s immediate reaction to training. Some common questions concern the room, temperature, facilitator skills, and so on. If you haven’t already, one question to consider is, “What topics do you want to see future training sessions focus on?” It’s an excellent opportunity for employees to express themselves. HR may notice some trends worth investigating.

While this type of evaluation may appear to be very basic on the surface, first impressions are important. This will provide insight into what an employee is likely telling their coworkers after training.

Focus Groups

When you have groups undergoing a programme together, like new hires attending orientation and onboarding, the focus group format can be useful. Or a management development programme where participants engage in a variety of educational tasks over time.

By seeking employee feedback, an organisation is able to assess the programme that has just ended and make inquiries about potential future iterations of the programme. Ideas that the individuals wouldn’t have thought to share individually may be suggested by the group.

When it comes time to evaluate learning, organisations must ensure that the programme objectives were met. While using business metrics is beneficial, don’t overlook employee feedback.

Employee reactions to the learning activity will be communicated in the cafeteria and via text messages. If employees enjoy the learning, their coworkers will want to know when they will be able to attend. Employees who dislike it will find reasons not to participate. And this, in turn, has an impact on the business metric that the program is attempting to change.

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